Sunday, January 24, 2016

The first 101 stamps issued in the Netherlands

These are the first 101 stamps issued in the Netherlands. These stamps were issued between 1852 and 1913. To determine the first 101 stamps, I used the NVPH (Nederlandsche Vereeniging van Postzegelhandelaren) catalog. I also list the Scott catalog numbers after the NVPH numbers, this way you can quickly look up these stamps if you have either of those two catalogs.

1852 King William III




NVPH 1-3
Scott 1-3

William III (Willem Alexander Paul Frederik Lodewijk, anglicised: William Alexander Paul Frederick Louis; 19 February 1817 – 23 November 1890) was King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg from 1849 until his death in 1890. He was also the Duke of Limburg from 1849 until the abolition of the duchy in 1866.
William was the son of King William II and Anna Pavlovna of Russia. On the abdication of his grandfather William I in 1840, he became the Prince of Orange. On the death of his father in 1849, he succeeded as King of the Netherlands.

1864 King William III




NVPH 4-6
Scott 4-6


1867 - 1868 King William III






NVPH 7-12
Scott 7-12


1869 - 1871 Coat Of Arms




NVPH 13-18
Scott 17-22


1872 - 1888 King William III







NVPH 19-29
Scott 23-33



1976 - 1894 Numerals





NVPH 30-33
Scott 34-37


1891 - 1894 Princess Wilhelmina







NVPH 34-48
Scott  40-54


1898 Queen Wilhelmina Coronation





NVPH 49
Scott 83 type I
This stamp was issued for Queen Wilhelmina's coronation. The number 1 is thicker and wider in this stamp than the stamp issued in 1899.

Wilhelmina (Wilhelmina Helena Pauline Maria; 31 August 1880 – 28 November 1962) was Queen of the Kingdom of the Netherlands from 1890 to 1948. She reigned for nearly 58 years, longer than any other Dutch monarch. Her reign saw World War I and World War II, the economic crisis of 1933, and the decline of the Netherlands as a major colonial power.


1899 - 1913 Numerals



NVPH 50-55
Scott 55-60


1899 - 1921 Queen Wilhelmina











NVPH 56-76
Scott 61-82


1899-1905 Queen Wilhelmina





NVPH 77-80
Scott 83-86


1924 Queen Wilhelmina tête-bêche





NVPH 69b, 69c
Scott 66a

In philately, tête-bêche is a joined pair of stamps in which one is upside-down in relation to the other, produced intentionally or accidentally. Like any pair of stamps, a pair of tête-bêches can be a vertical or a horizontal pair. In the case of a pair of triangular stamps, they cannot help but be linked "head-to-tail".


1922 Queen Wilhelmina




NVPH 81
Scott 110
This is a redrawn version of the 1899 edition, the lines behind the Queen's head are wider apart.


1923 Queen Wilhelmina




NVPH 82-83
Scott 111-112
Because of a strike at the printer, these were issued imperforated


1906 Tuberculosis



 

NVPH 84-86
Scott B1-B3
The design is symbolical of the four chief means for combating tuberculosis: light, water, air and food


1907 De Ruyter




NVPH 87-89
Scott 87-89
Michiel Adriaenszoon de Ruyter and fleet. De Ruyter (24 March 1607 – 29 April 1676) was a Dutch admiral. He is the most famous and one of the most skilled admirals in Dutch history, most famous for his role in the Anglo-Dutch Wars of the 17th century. He fought the English and French and scored several major victories against them, the best known probably being the Raid on the Medway


1913 Centenary of Dutch independence






NVPH 90-101
Scott 90-101
Depicted on these stamps are: William I, William II, William III and Wilhelmina

After the liberation of the Netherlands from France by Prussian and Russian troops in 1813, a provisional government took over the country. It was headed by a triumvirate of three Dutch noblemen, Frans Adam van der Duyn van Maasdam, Leopold of Limburg Stirum and Gijsbert Karel van Hogendorp. This Driemanschap formally took control over the liberated country on 20 November, and declared the Principality of the United Netherlands a day thereafter



Video

Here is also a video with all these stamps.... makes a nice screensaver.....